Twitter locks some accounts after 32 million passwords appear on dark web

Twitter has responded to reports indicating that tens of millions of usernames and passwords for the social media service are currently available on the dark web, specifying that it is “confident the information was not obtained from a hack of Twitter’s servers,” and that the purported passwords may have come from breaches of other sites and malware hidden on its users’ computers.

News that more than 32 million purported Twitter passwords were being traded on the dark web surfaced Wednesday night. A day later, after cross-checking the password dump with its records, Twitter identified some of its accounts as requiring extra protection, locking them and requiring a password reset. It’s not clear how many accounts Twitter chose to lock,…

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